• Martyn Wakefield

DOUBLE DATE (REVIEW)

Dir. Benjamin Barfoot

Reviewer. Martyn Wakefield

DOUBLE DATE is hands down the film the world needs right now. In the face of the contentious rulings in America, it's apt that a film about two killer women in a cultish sacrificial plot would be the models that society needs.


What begins with a grizzly murder while on a double date, Kelly Wenham mercilessly kills her partner and encourages her sister to do the same with hers. Despite the blood splattered body, the wit laced dialogue sets the tone and while there's no ignoring the gore, this is a genuinely hilarious blend of comedy horror done right.


The films journey of discovery for the two women's motives is a gripping one that traverses male aggression, similar to 2021s PRETTY YOUNG WOMAN, to summoning the dead with horrific consequences and while it never forces an agenda, plays a nice balance between greater good and evil between the girls murderous venture.


Fortunately, DOUBLE DATE, knows what it wants to be and rather than be full blown comedy, plays to its horror elements really well. The cast, through sharp tongues and drugs, bring a light hearted and relatable experience to characters that could have easily fallen into tropes. Something British comedies tend to do so well.


Whenham steals every scene with her powerful assertion and while Georgia Groome doesn't share her passion, brings a loveable charm to proceedings, especially as she watches on in an embarrassing meet-the-parents scenario. DOUBLE DATE is a must see for fans of British horror that stays true to its roots while also raising a smile.



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