• Martyn Wakefield

LIFEFORCE (REVIEW)

Dir. Tobe Hooper

Reviewer. Martyn Wakefield

LIFEFORCE sees the space shuttle Churchill investigate the return of Halley’s comet only to discover a hidden alien craft harbouring the remains of some bat like creatures and bodies of what look like human beings. When the shuttle goes AWOL, another shuttle heads to save the crew but instead finds the crew are already dead and the sole survivors are the bodies found from the alien craft.

Returning to earth it doesn’t take long before the lifeless bodies regain consciousness seeking the lifeforce of others for their own survival. The space vampires don’t stop at the compound they are kept in and when they escape, the future of the human race becomes nigh on extinct until an epic climax that proves to be Hooper’s biggest film to date.

In 1985 terror was bought to earth and the threat to the planet was ahead of its time and not seen again for another 11 years when INDEPENDENCE DAY blew cinema’s wild. Only this beast packs a vicious slice of vampire punch with it.

Arrow have done a fantastic job with the transfer and while some of the effects may look dated in todays market, the raw power of LIFEFORCE lives on. Steve Railsback and Peter Firth performance’ as the leads Tom Carlson and SAS Colonel Craine leading the resistance against the growing mound of zombie mayhem are as brilliant as they were in ’85. With Michael Gothard (FOR YOUR EYES ONLY) and Patrick Stewart (STAR TREK, X-MEN) giving supporting roles, there is no denying that LIFEFORCE is a cult classic.

Placed with the epic scale of B-Movie world disaster with Hooper’s penchant for the macabre will ensure this won’t be seen in any bargain bins anytime soon. Arrow have filled this vessel with everything and anything. Interviews with the cast and director, two cuts of the film, an extensive making of and who could possible refuse the persuasion of Mathilda May in high definition.




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