• Martyn Wakefield

PREY [2022] (REVIEW)

Dir. Dan Trachtenberg

Reviewer. Martyn Wakefield

It's apt that this film is called PREY, as it is the complete antithesis of PREDATOR. A much more stripped back setting (rural aboriginal America), a fearless female lead, a slower build up and a disposable cast of allies and foes.


Where PREDATOR gave viewers the shock of an ensemble cast of macho men hiding in pure fear against the alien threat, here, Naru (Amber Midthunder) delivers a woman who strives to he top of the food chain. This is Naru's story and becomes an evolution from a subdued female of her tribe into the saviour and ultimate predator. I can't help but be drawn to the contrast of Elpidia Carrillo's damsel in John McTiernan's film.


Dan Trachtenberg (10 CLOVERFIELD LANE) brings fresh blood to the franchise and despite it's initial abstract nature to it's original, manages to succeed in being the series second best film. Bringing with it more inventive deaths, more blood and a new mask, this is sure to make a few fans happy since the disappointment to the franchises more recent efforts.


Midwinter is a star in the making and adding her standout performance here onto her resumé will only catapult her to bigger screens. Unfortunately the rest of the cast become fodder for the Predator and as such lacks the connection the likes of Jesse Ventura and Bill Duke had when being hunted down.


While it still hides in the shadow of the 1987 classic (especially with a rather lacklustre score) it has a host of memorable moments that make this more popcorn friendly than perhaps some of the films plot twists wouod want to be considered but that's really no bad thing. There are a couple of big action sequences that make the franchise best at least. And to add, an all native American cast is a celebration of a culture of white saviour and for that it should be applauded. It would be interesting where the Predator would turn up next (it's co-ordinates always seem to be set to North America!?)



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