• Martyn Wakefield

THE 7TH VOYAGE OF SINBAD (REVIEW)

Dir. Nathan Juran

Reviewer. Dan Cook

A classic swashbuckler if there ever was one, 1958’s THE 7TH VOYAGE OF SINBAD is a thrilling fantasy adventure that boasts some of the finest work by the legendary special effects legend Ray Harryhausen.


The first in a trilogy of highly successful Sinbad features made by Columbia Pictures, Nathan Juran’s technicolour triumph stars Kerwin Matthews as the fearless Arabian Prince who, to save his love (Kathryn Grant) from the powers of a brilliant yet selfish Sorceror (Torin Thatcher) embarks on a death-defying journey across the seas to the island of Cyclopes where lies the key to her safety.


The story which, despite its title, takes its inspiration from the third and fifth ‘Sinbad’ tales of old, is a truly timeless one - an exciting saga of good vs. evil with well-defined character types and enjoyable performances that can be enjoyed by audiences of all ages.


However, the true majesty of THE 7TH VOYAGE OF SINBAD come in the forms of maestro Bernard Herrman’s rousing score and Harryhausen’s patented “Dynamation” effects which breathes life into some of the most memorable monsters in cinema history - one of which, a skeleton soldier, would clearly inspire some of the most iconic moments seen in JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS some 5 years later.



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